Acciona to build 145MW windfarm in Texas, US

12 April 2018 (Last Updated April 12th, 2018 11:55)

Spanish renewable energy company Acciona Energía is planning to build the new 145MW Palmas Altas windfarm in Texas, US.

Acciona to build 145MW windfarm in Texas, US
San Roman was the first ACCIONA Wind Farm in Texas. Credit: ACCIONA

Spanish renewable energy company Acciona Energía is planning to build the new 145MW Palmas Altas windfarm in Texas, US.

Acciona Energía will be investing $200m for constructing the new windfarm, which will be equipped with 46 of Nordex’s AW3150 wind turbines, with a rotor diameter of 125m.

The turbines will be mounted on an 87.5m steel tower (hub height).

The Palmas Altas wind farm project is reported to be the second project taken up by the Acciona Energía in Texas and the ninth in the US.

Acciona Energy USA Global CEO Rafael Esteban said: “We are proud to undertake a new wind power project that consolidates the reactivation of our investment activity in the US and confirms our commitment to grow in a controlled and profitable manner in a market that continues to offer very interesting opportunities for the renewables sector.”

“We are proud to undertake a new wind power project that consolidates the reactivation of our investment activity in the US.”

Located in Cameron County, the new plant is expected to produce around 524GWh of clean energy a year, which is enough to power 43,000 households, as well as reduce 503,000mt of carbon released by coal-fired power stations into the atmosphere.

During the peak construction period, the Palmas Altas project is expected to create nearly 170 employment opportunities while ten people will be employed by the company as part of their operations team.

The energy generated by the windfarm will be sold in the ERCOT-South Texas wholesale market.

Acciona Energía currently owns and operates eight windfarms located across the US, including San Roman (93MW), Oklahoma (329MW), Dakotas (192MW), Illinois (101MW) and Iowa (6MW). It also has a 64MW CSP plant in Nevada.