Copenhagen Climate Talks Hit Deadlock

16 December 2009 (Last Updated December 16th, 2009 18:30)

Prospects for a strong UN climate change deal grew more remote today with developed and developing nations deadlocked on sharing cuts in greenhouse gases. Dozens of heads of state are heading to the Danish capital to address the December 7-18 conference, which is meant to sign a new pac

Prospects for a strong UN climate change deal grew more remote today with developed and developing nations deadlocked on sharing cuts in greenhouse gases.

Dozens of heads of state are heading to the Danish capital to address the December 7-18 conference, which is meant to sign a new pact to curb greenhouse gas emissions on Friday.

Ministers have struggled to craft a coherent text for the leaders to sign because they have so far failed to close a rift over how far the developing world should join industrialized countries in cutting carbon emissions, reports Reuters.

A Danish proposal to break the talks into smaller groups to speed up progress foundered on opposition from poor countries, backed by top greenhouse gas emitter China.

China told participants it saw no possibility of achieving a detailed accord to tackle global warming, an official from another nation involved in the talks said early on Thursday.

In Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu told reporters China was committed to the negotiations. "China hopes the Copenhagen meeting is successful, and has always taken a constructive attitude," she said, reports Reuters.