BMT to provide key services for world’s largest experimental Tokamak nuclear fusion reactor

1 December 2013 (Last Updated December 1st, 2013 18:30)

BMT Hi-Q Sigma, a subsidiary of BMT Group, has won a contract from Fusion for Energy (F4E) to provide configuration management and system engineering support over the next four years under a €2.2m Euros framework agreement.

BMT Hi-Q Sigma, a subsidiary of BMT Group, has won a contract from Fusion for Energy (F4E) to provide configuration management and system engineering support over the next four years under a €2.2m Euros framework agreement.

Under the contract, BMT will offer configuration management, project documentation, requirements-management and verification activities to help ensure successful delivery for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project.

"The project aims to demonstrate the technical and scientific feasibility to produce commercial energy from nuclear fusion."

The project, which is touted as the world's largest experimental Tokamak nuclear fusion reactor, is based on the 'Tokamak' concept of magnetic confinement, in which the plasma is contained in a doughnut-shaped vacuum vessel.

The project, which is aimed at demonstrating the technical and scientific feasibility to produce commercial energy from nuclear fusion, was conceptualised in the 1980s in order reduce reliance on fossil fuels to generate electricity and thereby curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

The ITER machine, which will use 50MW of input power to produce 500MW of fusion power, will test key technologies necessary for the next step. The demonstration fusion power plant will prove that it is possible to capture fusion energy for commercial use.

In October 2007, seven parties including China, EURATOM (the joint European undertaking), India, Japan, South Korea, Russia and the US have formally established the ITER Organization in Cadarache, France and have signed the ITER joint implementation agreement.

In 2008, F4E, in association with the European Commission, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and ITER Organisation, successfully tested a prototype superconductor for the ITER Poloidal Field coils made of Niobium-Titanium, reaching a stable operation at 52kA in a magnetic field of 6.4 Tesla.

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