ITER selects Intergraph’s engineering technology for Cadarache nuclear plant

4 October 2012 (Last Updated October 4th, 2012 18:30)

ITER, an international nuclear fusion research and engineering project, has selected software manufacturer Intergraph to help support the construction of the world's largest experimental nuclear fusion reactor at Cadarache in the south of France.

ITER_Cadarache

ITER, an international nuclear fusion research and engineering project, has selected software manufacturer Intergraph to help support the construction of the world's largest experimental nuclear fusion reactor at Cadarache in the south of France.

Intergraph will provide its SmartPlant Enterprise suite of products to handle the assembly, commissioning, construction, operations and maintenance of the plant being built in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region.

Under the agreement, the company will implement SmartPlant Enterprise solutions including SmartPlant Foundation, SmartPlant Construction, SmartPlant Materials and SmartPlant Enterprise for Owner Operators.

Preconfigured processes will be provided by SmartPlant Enterprise for Owner Operators to support engineering and project execution work processes during the plant design, construction and completion/start-up phase.

Meanwhile, SmartPlant Foundation will play a role in data synchronisation and data sharing, and SmartPlant Enterprise will offer synchronised information and centralized data to manage work processes, control equipment and maintenance, coordinate contractors and manage change.

The construction of the plant is expected to be completed in 2019 and the first equipment will be delivered in 2014.

Intergraph Assembly and Operations Division head, Ken Blackler, said: "ITER will be the world's first licenced nuclear fusion device and therefore Intergraph's footprint in the nuclear power generation sector, with more than 20 years of experience, played an important role in the final decision making."


Image: An aerial view of the ITER construction site in Cadarache, France. Photo: courtesy of ITER Organization.