Jacobson Elektro to develop 360MW combined-cycle power plant in Ghana

6 September 2013 (Last Updated September 6th, 2013 05:43)

Norwegian energy company Jacobsen Elektro, through its Ghanaian unit Jacobson Jelco, plans to develop a 360MW combined-cycle power plant (CCPP) on 45 acres of land at Inchaban in the Shama District in the western region.

Power Plant

Norwegian energy company Jacobsen Elektro, through its Ghanaian unit Jacobson Jelco, plans to develop a 360MW combined-cycle power plant (CCPP) on 45 acres of land at Inchaban in the Shama District in the western region.

Construction of the plant, which will use natural gas and light crude oil to generate electricity, is likely to begin in 2014 after the completion of the necessary approval procedure.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently held a public hearing on the environmental and social impact assessment of the company's proposal to facilitate an opportunity to discuss the potential impacts and draft proposed mitigation measures to address those problems.

EPA western regional director Yaw Sarfo-Afriyie said that they will continue to hold the consultation process even after pre-constructional and the constructional phases should the local populace call for.

"We shall continue to consult you if need be, so that together we work towards attaining the goal of sustainable development and also ensure a better future for all," Sarfo-Afriyie said.

The company has already compensated 32 farmers affected by the project, which will be built under public-private partnership.

"Construction of the plant is likely to begin in 2014 after the completion of the necessary approval procedure."

Jacobsen Elektro environmental specialist Steffan Asplund said that the company will study and identify the proposed project's negative impacts on the environment and the people as well as formulate remedial measures to address them.

Ghana is aimed at becoming a major exporter of electricity as part the country's broader energy sector vision for 2020 and is endowed with such opportunity under the West African Power Pool (WAPP) Project.

The WAPP, a cooperation of national electricity companies in Western Africa, has been working for developing a reliable power grid for the region and a common market for electricity.


Image: The power plant will use natural gas and light crude oil to generate electricity. Photo: courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.

Energy