Lebanon’s landfill gas-to-energy project to use GE’s Jenbacher engine technology

15 July 2013 (Last Updated July 15th, 2013 18:30)

Lebanon will launch the first-of-its-kind landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) project in Naameh, near Beirut, using GE’s ecomagination qualified Jenbacher gas engine technology, in an effort to address the growing demand for electricity in the country.

GE's Jenbacher engine technology

Lebanon will launch the first-of-its-kind landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) project in Naameh, near Beirut, utilising GE's ecomagination-qualified Jenbacher gas engine technology, in an effort to address the growing demand for electricity in the country.

The project, which is operated by Averda International, is expected to start operations during the last quarter of 2013, and will generate 637kW of renewable electricity and eliminate around 12,400t of carbon dioxide emissions.

Landfill gas contains approximately 55% methane and 45% carbon dioxide greenhouse gases, which contribute to environmental degradation.

GE's Jenbacher gas engines will use methane gas as a fuel to generate electricity, while after completion the project will reduce the landfill's emissions and contribute to Lebanon's environmental sustainability.

"The contribution of the project to the environment and the energy sector makes it a great value to the community."

Averda International supply chain director Hani Wazzan said the project reflects the company's focus on adopting environmentally sustainable alternatives and inspiring similar applications for other projects.

"The twin challenges of landfill management -- promoting environmental sustainability and tapping the site's renewable energy potential -- are being addressed through Averda's collaboration with GE, with Averda providing the quality engineered setting and GE supplying its advanced Jenbacher gas engine," Wazzan said.

GE said its Jenbacher engine technology is part of its portfolio of distributed power solutions, which will allow businesses and communities to generate efficient power using a variety of fuels in different locations on or off the grid.

GE Middle East, North Africa and Turkey (MENAT) region president and CEO Nabil Habayeb said the Naameh project could encourage other landfill sites to use the gas that is currently being flared for conversion to electricity.

"The contribution of the project to the environment and the energy sector makes it a great value to the community," Habayeb said.


Image: GE's Jenbacher Type 3 Gas Engines. Photo: courtesy of GE.

Energy