Nova Scotia regulator rules in favor of 102MW South Canoe wind project

6 September 2013 (Last Updated September 6th, 2013 05:49)

The Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (URB) upheld Chester Municipal Council's approval of a development agreement for the 102MW South Canoe wind project in Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Onshore Wind

The Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (URB) upheld Chester Municipal Council's approval of a development agreement for the 102MW South Canoe wind project in Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

In March 2013, the council approved development agreements with proponents Nova Scotia Power, Minas Basin Pulp and Power and Oxford Frozen Foods to develop the wind power project on lands in the South Canoe Lake area, near New Russell and New Ross.

Friends of South Canoe Lake and Richburg LP Management and Homburg Land Bank filed an appeal against the council's decision; the appellants' concerns included issue of setback, the related issue of sound and the project's effects on the visual appearance of the area.

In its ruling on 5 September 2013, the URB dismissed appeals lodged by the appellants saying that the council carried out the intent of the municipal planning strategy.

In July 2012, the South Canoe project received environmental assessment approval from the Government of Nova Scotia under the Environment Act of the Environmental Assessment Regulations.

"The URB dismissed appeals lodged by the appellants saying that the council carried out the intent of the municipal planning strategy.

The Renewable Electricity Administrator (REA) awarded 102MW capacity to Oxford Frozen Foods (78MW) and Minas Basin Pulp and Power (24MW) in August 2012, following a competitive bidding process, which was started in September 2011. Nova Scotia Power holds a 49% minority stake in each project.

The plant, which will spread across more than 7,500 acres, will feature 34 wind turbines, each standing approximately 489ft tall, and generate enough electricity to power around 32,000 houses.

The project will create up to 20 construction jobs and five full time jobs, and pay approximately $660,000 in property taxes annually to the municipality.

Earlier the province of Nova Scotia, in order to meet its target of generating 25% of renewable electricity by 2015 and 40% by 2020, awarded renewable projects worth 355GWh to independent power producers through a competitive bidding process, managed by the Renewable Electricity Administrator.


Image: The South Canoe project will have 34 wind turbines in Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia. Photo: courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.com.

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