Survey reveals split attitude towards energy usage among UK consumers

17 February 2014 (Last Updated February 17th, 2014 18:30)

A survey by OnePoll and electrical supplies distributor Rexel has revealed 'split personality' on energy consumption behaviour among the UK consumers.

A survey by OnePoll and electrical supplies distributor Rexel has revealed a 'split personality' on energy consumption behaviour among the UK consumers.

According to the survey, 48% of the British public would say themselves as energy conscious at home, while only 20% say the same about their behaviour in the workplace.

More than 70% of consumers say they worry about wasting energy and 93% turn off the lights at home, while only 43% worry about wastage of electricity at work and instead 60% of employees actively charge personal devices and only 60% turn off the lights in the office.

Of the total employees charging personal devices at work, 32% admitted to daily charging sessions and 36% charging multiple devices that could be a concern for businesses across the UK.

"Long-term and mass behavioural change is required not just in the home but across all aspects of people's lives."

In addition to this, 32% of the UK consumers prefer to open a window at home when they are too hot rather than turn the heating down, while 47% in the workplace shown the varying behaviour on the same.

Rexel Northern European Zone strategic development director Brian Smithers said the research has revealed that the apparent trend is the average office worker spends at least 40 hours a week at work, and as such UK offices consume a huge percentage of energy, which is a major concern for the country.

"To reach the UK's carbon reduction target of 80% by 2050, long-term and mass behavioural change is required not just in the home but across all aspects of people's lives.

"There are huge opportunities for businesses to reduce energy bills by educating their employees, putting in place best practices and installing smart energy monitoring devices to help reach these targets, but also ultimately to save themselves money," said Smithers.

Energy