UK Government’s fifth carbon budget aims to reduce emissions by 57%

3 July 2016 (Last Updated July 3rd, 2016 18:30)

The UK Government has adopted the fifth carbon budget to reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions in 2032 by 57% when compared to levels in 1990.

The UK Government has adopted the fifth carbon budget to reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions in 2032 by 57% when compared to levels in 1990.

In November 2015, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) advised the government to draw a budget, which would follow the lowest-cost path to long-term targets and to avoid stop-start investment.

The Solar Trade Association has welcomed the adoption of a fifth budget and the strong support shown by CCC for solar energy. Its chairman and solar consulting director Jonathan Selwyn said: "As an industry, we are on the path to a subsidy-free future, we hope by the early 2020s.

"To achieve this, we need a flourishing UK industry and a government, which allows us to compete on a level playing field with other renewables, as well as nuclear and gas."

"After the election, there has been a significant weakening of policies, including the cancellation of Zero Carbon Homes."

CCC has stated that after the election, there has been a significant weakening of policies, including the cancellation of Zero Carbon Homes.

Solar Trade Association's vice-chairman Seb Berry said: "Yesterday, Minister Andrea Leadsom told the House of Commons Energy and Climate Change Select Committee that the government now projected a total of 13GWp of solar deployed in the UK by 2020.

"This represents a significant reduction from Ministers' previous ambition for 20GWp or more by the end of this decade."

The CCC has also expressed its concerns regarding the rising shortfall of the government in providing the fourth carbon budget for the period 2023-2027.

According to the committee, by 2020 the favourable sites for large solar power generation are expected to be as cheap or cheaper than gas-fired power generation.