UK plans to support £1bn lagoon power plant series

1 March 2015 (Last Updated March 1st, 2015 18:30)

The UK intends to generate renewable power from incoming and outgoing tides at six lagoons in the country, four of which are in Wales and one each in Somerset and Cumbria.

Plans have been announced in the UK to generate renewable power from incoming and outgoing tides at six lagoons in the country, with four in Wales and one each in Somerset and Cumbria.

The £1bn project is expected enough power for 155,000 homes, reports BBC.

The project is likely to be supported by the government, according to UK Energy Secretary Ed Davey.

Davey was quoted by the news channel as saying: "I can’t make a decision on this yet because discussions are ongoing. But I’m very excited by the prospect of tidal power.

"The project will be funded by electricity bill-payers under the existing government scheme to boost domestic, low-carbon energy."

"We have got some of the biggest tidal ranges in the world and it would be really useful if we could harness some of that clean energy."

The proposed projects will be developed at Swansea, Cardiff, Newport, and Colwyn Bay in Wales, as well as Bridgwater in Somerset, and in West Cumbria.

New sea walls would be constructed at the sites, where the weight of the water will be used to power installed turbines.

Tidal Lagoon Power is the developer for the Swansea Bay scheme. It is presently in talks with the UK Government about the charges to be fixed for the power supply to customers.

The project will be funded by electricity bill-payers under the existing government scheme to boost domestic, low-carbon energy.

Cost of power generation from the tides, however, is expected to be high, with the six projects offering up to 8% of the country’s energy requirements for a £30bn investment.

Tidal Lagoon Power CEO Mark Shorrock said:"It is admittedly rather expensive to begin with, but as time goes on and the capital costs are paid off it becomes incredibly cheap."