UK rejects four onshore wind power proposals in Wales

7 September 2015 (Last Updated September 7th, 2015 18:30)

The UK's Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has revealed planning decisions for six wind power projects in Wales, with four having been denied permission.

The UK’s Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has revealed planning decisions for six wind power projects in Wales, with four having been denied permission.

The four rejected projects are Llanbadarn Fynydd, Llaithddu, Llanbrynmair and Carnedd Wen. These onshore wind energy schemes were expected to have a combined capacity of more than 300MW of power.

"Given the blows [to the] renewable energy sector on both consents and subsidies, ministers will be heading to the Paris climate discussions with their credibility in tatters."

A DECC spokesperson said: "Careful consideration has been given to each application, and the planning and energy issues involved."

The authority has also rejected the proposal for the Llandinam to Welshpool Substation overhead power line connection.

Consent has only been given for the Llandinam onshore wind farm repowering project. According to Welsh renewable energy trade association RenewableUK Cymru, the repowering project is likely to struggle without the substation.

Earlier in the year, the DECC announced a subsidy cut for new onshore wind developments in the country. The limitations, which are expected to be implemented from April next year, have cut prospects for more than 2,500 wind turbine installations in Wales, amounting to 7.1GW of production capacity.

RenewableUK Cymru director David Clubb said: "Given the blows the UK Government are raining down onto the renewable energy sector on both consents and subsidies, ministers will be heading to the Paris climate discussions with their credibility in tatters."