US DOE’s OTT seeks proposals to bring new energy technologies to market

7 February 2016 (Last Updated February 7th, 2016 18:30)

The US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Technology Transitions (OTT) is seeking proposals to bring new energy technologies (engineered in national laboratories) to market, in a bid to foster innovation and commercialisation in the power sector.

The US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Technology Transitions (OTT) is seeking proposals to bring new energy technologies (engineered in national laboratories) to market, in a bid to foster innovation and commercialisation in the power sector.

This year, the department’s Technology Commercialisation Fund (TCF) has been infused with $20m from across the department.

The fund is supposed to be utilised to promote promising energy related technologies and help strengthen partnerships between the national labs and private sector companies.

TCF funds will be used to match 50% non-federal funds from private partners.

"Every day our national labs are developing innovative new technologies that have the potential to revolutionise the way we generate, store, and transmit energy."

Such fund emphasises DOE’s bid to capitalise the federally funded portfolio of research, development, demonstration, and deployment activities to increase return-on-investment.

Office of Technology Transitions director Jetta Wong said: "Every day our national labs are developing innovative new technologies that have the potential to revolutionise the way we generate, store, and transmit energy.

"But in order to accelerate the use of clean energy technologies, we need to get more of these breakthroughs out of our labs and into our marketplace. The launch of this fund is an important milestone for OTT as it approaches its one-year anniversary and demonstrates our efforts to expand the commercial impact of DOE’s research and development portfolio."

The TCF is expected to fortify the government’s attempt to foster lab-industry partnerships, where funds will be matched by private partners to incorporate energy technologies into commercial purposes.

About 17 of the DOE affiliated national laboratories are expected to submit their proposals this year, which will be reviewed by DOE personnel and independent evaluators.

In 2012, US energy secretary Steven Chu announced an investment of $12m for the promotion of solar energy technology into the marketplace through the energy department’s SunShot Incubator programme.