Wessex Archaeology unearths artifacts on Hornsea Project One cable route

7 February 2018 (Last Updated February 7th, 2018 13:03)

UK-based archaeology and heritage practice Wessex Archaeology has unearthed archaeological remains in Lincolnshire and the surrounding areas during an excavation process for the onshore construction phase of the Hornsea Project One offshore windfarm.

Wessex Archaeology unearths artifacts on Hornsea Project One cable route
Aerial view of saltern site North Coates Hornsea One. Credit: Wessex Archaeology.

UK-based archaeology and heritage practice Wessex Archaeology has unearthed archaeological remains in Lincolnshire and the surrounding areas during an excavation process for the onshore construction phase of the Hornsea Project One offshore windfarm.

Wessex Archaeology carried out archaeological excavations works for the onshore cable route on behalf of the windfarm’s primary developer, Danish power company Ørsted.

Ørsted environment and consents manager Bronagh Byrne said: “Most people wouldn’t associate renewable energy sources with historical artefacts, but it just goes to show the variety of activities needed to build an offshore windfarm.

“We are burying our cables as we understand the sensitivity to the surrounding landscape and the importance this is to local stakeholders and residents.”

“We are burying our cables as we understand the sensitivity to the surrounding landscape and the importance this is to local stakeholders and residents.”

The Hornsea Project One offshore windfarm will have the capacity to generate enough energy to power over one million homes upon completion.

It is expected to begin commercial operations in 2020.

The windfarm will be located 120km off the Yorkshire Coast, while the onshore cable route is slated to run for approximately 40km.

The route will be laid between Horseshoe Point, east of Tetney, and a new substation situated in North Killingholme, North Lincolnshire.

Wessex Archaeology personnel and other staff have been working with Ørsted since August 2015.

Wessex Archaeology project manager Richard O’Neill said: “Large, linear schemes like this can be challenging; we’ve had seventy people working on the scheme over two years, with some pretty inclement weather at times.

“Work has included excavation of two Iron Age settlement sites in North Killingholme, prehistoric farming activity and a Romano-British settlement in Stallingborough, Romano-British settlement sites in Tetney and Holton-le-Clay, and medieval moated sites in Harborough and South Killingholme.”