Future Power Technology: Issue 71

3 February 2016 (Last Updated July 30th, 2020 20:33)

In this issue: Construction of the world’s largest floating wind farm, GE’s $1bn clean energy business spin-off, the UK’s turnaround on solar subsidies and its continued funding of fossil fuels, Kazakhstan’s uranium storage bank, a revolutionary lithium-oxygen battery concept, and more.

Future Power Technology: Issue 71

Future Power Technology - Issue 71

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Norwegian oil giant Statoil is preparing to build the world's largest floating wind farm off the coast of Scotland. Not only will Hywind Pilot Park be a proving ground for the indstry, but it will also support Statoil's hopes of floating multiple, cost-effective farms in markets worldwide. We explore the benefits and challenges facing floating wind farms.

Also, we profile GE's $1bn green energies and software business spin-off, get insight into the UK's back-tracking on its solar funding cuts, and investigate why it is also disproportionately investing in foreign fossil fuel projects.

Plus, we see how Kazakhstan's uranium bank could safeguard both the nuclear energy industry as well as developer countries, and take a look at a lithium-oxygen battery concept that could recharge energy storage technology.

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In this issue

Intelligent Energy
GE has invested $1bn in new venture, Current. We profile the spin-off, which is focused on developing businesses in fields such as solar power, energy storage and software.
Read the article here.

The Sun Sets on Solar
The UK Government is revising its solar subsidy cuts following a public and industry backlash. We ask, can the proposed low-level funding bring the industry to independence by its target date of 2020?
Read the article here.

Time for a Sea Change
Norwegian oil giant Statoil is set to build the world's largest floating wind farm, Hywind, off the coast of Scotland. Are floating turbines the key to reducing the cost of wind power?
Read the article here.

The Ultimate Battery
Cambridge scientists have developed a working laboratory demonstrator of a lithium-oxygen battery with a very high energy density. The concept solves two major problems of battery technology, but can it be brought to full-scale production?
Read the article here.

A Nuclear Reaction
In an attempt to safeguard fuel supplies for nuclear power stations and limit the potential for nuclear proliferation, the International Atomic Energy Agency and Kazakhstan have agreed to build the world's largest uranium producer, to build a low-enriched uranium bank. We investigate how the facility will affect the civil nuclear landscape.
Read the article here.

A Necessary Evil?
The UK reportedly invested over £2bn in fossil fuel projects between 2009 and 2013 as part of overseas aid packages to countries urgently needing energy double the amount spent on clean energy projects. We profile five UK-led overseas fossil fuel projects to find out why.
Read the article here.

Next issue preview

Earlier this year British Energy Secretary Amber Rudd announced that the UK's remaining coal-fired power stations will be closed by 2025 with their use largely restricted by 2023. We take a look at the nation's coal-fired infrastructure to find out how the major stations will prepare for their impending phase-out.

Also, we look into new energy company Rolton Kilbride's efforts to develop waste-to-energy projects, see how GE's newly acquired wind turbine developer Blade Dynamics is changing the blade manufacturing process, and catch up with researchers at The University of Manchester to report on their breakthrough in developing a renewable biosynthesis of propane.

Plus we speak to researchers at a Swedish university about a new cellulose-polymer material with an outstanding ability to store energy, and hear about smart grid solutions by information and technology giant Huawei.

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