Future Power Technology Magazine: Issue 59

6 February 2015 (Last Updated February 6th, 2015 10:03)

In this issue: How increasing construction of hydropower dams will affect the environment, developing a nuclear reactor powered by Thorium, pushing the boundaries of betavoltaic electricity generation, catching up with Minesto’s Deep Green plant after a year in action, global energy policy and climate change, and more.

Future Power Technology Magazine: Issue 59

FPT1412featureimage | February 2015

Hydropower dam construction is on the rise, but while a hydropower boom looks set to bring many positives, experts warn of severe implications for the environment. We investigate the threat of increasing construction of hydropower dams to freshwater biodiversity and efforts to promote sustainable development.

Focusing in on energy policy, we reflect on the Republican Party’s success in the 2014 US mid-term elections and what a GOP-dominated Congress could mean for US emissions regulations, and also find out what effect a potential UK split from the EU could have on European and UK energy strategies. Looking at the bigger picture, we analyse a new report urging the world’s governments to co-operate on climate change.

In nuclear power, we speak to researchers developing a nuclear reactor that will replace uranium with thorium as a fuel source, learn about pioneering technology being used to create long-lasting, more efficient nuclear batteries, and hear from the WNA about increasing globalisation means for the civic nuclear supply chain.

Moreover, we catch up with Minesto’s Deep Green plant, having now been in operation off Northern Ireland for more than a year.

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In this issue

The Bigger Picture
A new report on climate change stresses the need for more international cooperation. But as a binding agreement remains elusive, are the world’s governments capable of decisive action before it’s too late? Chris Lo investigates.
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Better Together
With the UK more likely than ever before to sever ties with the EU, Elly Earls asks what this move would mean for European and UK energy strategies.
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Reflections on a Breakthrough
In 2013 Minesto made waves in the industry when it became the first to produce electricity from low velocity currents. With the Deep Green plant now having been in operation off Northern Ireland for more than a year, Minesto founder and CEO Anders Jansson shares his experiences from the trial.
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Boom and Bust
An unprecedented surge in hydropower dam construction, particularly in emerging countries, will bring significant environmental benefits but expert warns that these dams pose a threat to freshwater biodiversity. Abi Millar finds out more.
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By the Power of Thorium
Researchers in the US are working with Cambridge University to develop a nuclear reactor that will use thorium instead of uranium as a fuel source. Adam Leach asks, could thorium change the future of nuclear power generation?
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International Links in the Supply Chain
As the nuclear industry feels the effect of increasing globalisation David Hess, nuclear analyst at the WNA, explores future opportunities and what they mean for the supply chain
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Power Surge
Researchers in the US are using pioneering technology to create long-lasting, more efficient nuclear batteries. Julian Turner talks to staff at the University of Missouri about pushing the boundaries of betavoltaic electricity generation
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A Dirty War
The Republican Party scored a major victory in the 2014 US mid-term elections and looks set to wage war on President Obama’s historic climate change reforms. Julian Turner analyses what a GOP-dominated congress could mean for US energy policy and emissions regulations.
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Next issue preview

Funded by the Gates Foundation, the Omniprocessor plant converts human waste into drinking water and electricity. We take a look at the development and potential of this innovative project.

We also find out how a new alliance of heavyweights from a range of industries is collaborating to achieve new breakthroughs in wireless charging technology.

Moreover, we look into the impacts of increased grid connectivity on the climate, learn how portable solar power technologies are empowering remote communities cut off from the grid and find out how the rise of cheap gas will affect the nuclear industry.

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