Max Planck Institute - Flywheel Energy Storage System, Germany
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Max Planck Institute – Flywheel Energy Storage System, Germany

By Carmen 28 Aug 2021

The Max Planck Institute – Flywheel Energy Storage System is a 387,000kW energy storage project located in Garching, Bavaria, Germany.

The electro-mechanical energy storage project uses flywheel as its storage technology. The project was commissioned in 1987.

Description

The Max Planck Institute – Flywheel Energy Storage System is owned by Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (100%).

The key application of the project is onsite power.

Additional information

The facility utilizes three flywheel generator systems for on-site power that is required for high energy fusion experiments. The name and technical details of each flywheel is as follows:
EZ2, built in 1973, has a nominal apparent power of 167 MVA, a power factor of 0.93, a resulting active power at nominal values of 155 MW, and a pulse duration of 9.7 sec.
EZ3, built in 1977, has a nominal apparent power of 144 MVA, a power factor of 0.86, a resulting active power at nominal values of 124 MW, and a pulse duration of 4.4 sec.
EZ4, built in 1987, has a nominal apparent power of 220 MVA, a power factor of 0.49, a resulting active power at nominal values of 108 MW, and a pulse duration of 6.7 sec.

Methodology

All publicly-announced energy storage projects included in this analysis are drawn from GlobalData’s Power IC. The information regarding the projects are sourced through secondary information sources such as country specific power players, company news and reports, statistical organisations, regulatory body, government planning reports and their publications and is further validated through primary from various stakeholders such as power utility companies, consultants, energy associations of respective countries, government bodies and professionals from leading players in the power sector.

Carmen

Carmen is a robot, or rather an algorithmic journalist, who creates valuable automated content for our audiences. Carmen's focus is to deliver deep, fact-based articles and to free up our human journalists to interpret, analyse and explain developments.