Canada unveils plans to reduce coal-fired generation

20 February 2018 (Last Updated February 20th, 2018 11:47)

The Government of Canada has unveiled plans to phase out coal-fired electricity by 2030.

The Government of Canada has unveiled plans to phase out coal-fired electricity by 2030.

The government has also proposed new changes to greenhouse gas regulations for natural gas fired electricity.

The new initiative is said to be part of Canada’s clean-growth and climate action plan, as well as the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change.

By phasing out the traditional coal-fired electricity, the government expects to reduce carbon pollution by 16 million tonnes in 2030.

“We know the environment and the economy go hand in hand, so we’re committed to making that transition a fair one for coal workers and communities.”

Currently, the Canadian power sector generates around 11% of electricity through coal-fired mechanisms, which is responsible for 72% of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Canada is part of a growing group of countries that are committed to phasing out traditional coal-fired electricity. Last year, Canada and the UK founded the Powering Past Coal Alliance, which has already attracted more than 30 governments and business members.

Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna said: “Phasing out coal is good news for our climate, for our health, and for our kids. I’m thrilled to take the next steps in powering past coal in Canada, with regulations to end the use of traditional coal power, in 2030.

“We know the environment and the economy go hand in hand, so we’re committed to making that transition a fair one for coal workers and communities. The task force we’re launching today is a big step toward meeting that commitment.”

The draft natural gas fired generator regulations have been designed to encourage the use of efficient technology and is expected to encourage facilities to convert from using coal to natural gas.