Gemma Power to proceed with 1.8GW natural gas-fired power plant in US

30 August 2019 (Last Updated August 30th, 2019 12:02)

Construction engineering company Argan has announced that its subsidiary Gemma Power System has received a notice to proceed on a 1.8GW natural gas-fired power plant in Guernsey County, Ohio, US.

Construction engineering company Argan has announced that its subsidiary Gemma Power System has received a notice to proceed on a 1.8GW natural gas-fired power plant in Guernsey County, Ohio, US.

The notice allows Gemma Power to carry out project engineering, procurement and construction activities.

GE has agreed to provide three single-shaft power trains for the Guernsey power station, which is being jointly developed by Caithness Energy and Apex Power Group.

Caithness Energy is a US-based independent power producer, which focuses on the development and acquisition of renewable energy and natural gas power plants in the country.

Caithness is said to have invested in 54 wind, geothermal, solar and natural gas power projects since 1995.

Caithness president Ross Ain said: “This project will bring cleaner, reliable energy to the area, boost the local economy through its construction spending and related economic activity, utilise locally produced natural gas, and generate tax revenue that should benefit local schools and other community priorities.”

GE’s three single-shaft power trains to be installed at the power station will make use of the 7HA.02 gas-fired turbines.

Gemma intends to begin construction works at the combined cycle facility immediately and complete the project by 2022.

Argan chairman and CEO Rainer Bosselmann said: “We are delighted to announce receiving a notice to proceed on this major project. It has taken time to convert our business development efforts into project starts and we appreciate the patience our shareholders have shown us.”

The power station will be situated in the Utica and Marcellus shale gas development area in southern Guernsey County, Ohio.

Upon completion, the facility will produce enough electricity to power nearly 1.5 million homes. It uses a combined cycle technology and a dry (air) cooling system.

The power station will boost the local economy by creating new jobs and through tax revenues for the local community and schools.