Heat batteries to be included in Home Energy Scotland loan scheme
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Heat batteries to be included in Home Energy Scotland loan scheme

09 May 2018

The Scottish Government has included heat batteries in its Home Energy Scotland Loan scheme, which offers financial assistance to homeowners to reduce energy consumption.

The Scottish Government has included heat batteries in its Home Energy Scotland Loan scheme, which offers financial assistance to homeowners to reduce energy consumption.

Under this scheme, homeowners and private landlords in Scotland are now eligible to apply for an interest-free loan of up to £6,000 to install these heat batteries.

Thermal energy storage solutions provider Sunamp has welcomed the government’s new decision.

“Hopefully, other countries will now follow Scotland’s lead so consumers everywhere can benefit from heat batteries to cut energy consumption.”

Sunamp founder and chief executive Andrew Bissell said: “We’re delighted that the Scottish Government is supporting energy storage systems in all forms.  We’re especially pleased that Scotland, where we are based, is the first country to offer government support for heat batteries.

“Hopefully, other countries will now follow Scotland’s lead so consumers everywhere can benefit from heat batteries to cut energy consumption.  They will then benefit in the same way they did when Feed in Tariffs became the standard support for solar PV.”

Homeowners seeking a loan for a heat battery must also apply for a renewable system such as solar PV or air source heat pumps.

Heat batteries can also be connected to a renewables system already installed at the homeowners and private landlord’s location.

Bissell added: “Anyone thinking about cutting fuel bills and increasing their comfort by using heat batteries to provide heating and hot water should contact Sunamp in the first instance and we will then put you in touch with Home Energy Scotland who will provide supplementary advice.”