Hydro-Québec to invest in Carillon generating station refurbishment

22 October 2020 (Last Updated October 22nd, 2020 16:37)

Canadian public utility company Hydro-Québec has announced an investment of C$750m ($570m) to refurbish its Carillon power generating station.

Hydro-Québec to invest in Carillon generating station refurbishment
Carillon is a run-of-river power plant in Canada. Credit: Hydro-Québec (CNW Group/ANDRITZ Hydro Canada).

Canadian public utility company Hydro-Québec has announced an investment of C$750m ($570m) to refurbish its Carillon power generating station.

The investment will be used primarily for replacing six generating units.

It will also be used for civil engineering works such as making adjustments to water passageways, upgrading electrical equipment and replacing the station roof.

Built during the early 1960s, Carillon is a run-of-river power plant, which is equipped with 14 generating units that have a total installed capacity of 753MW.

The plant is said to be one of the important assets of Hydro-Québec’s hydroelectric generating fleet.

Located close to the greater Montréal region, it supplies electricity to the grid during the peak consumption periods.

Hydro-Québec production chief innovation officer and president David Murray said: “The Carillon generating station is a symbol of our hydroelectric development and plays a strategic role in our production fleet.

“However, most of the generating units’ main components date back to the station’s original construction from 1959 to 1962. Hydropower generating stations have long service lives. With this refurbishment, Carillon will be producing clean renewable energy for decades to come.”

Hydro-Québec has appointed turbine manufacturer Andritz to supply and install six turbine-generator units.

Under the contract, Andritz will be responsible for the design, manufacturing, transportation, assembly, testing and commissioning of the entire equipment.

The contract includes complete re-equipment of the all six units with new generators, speed governors and Kaplan-type turbines.

Work is slated to begin next year and will continue until 2027.

Upon completion, the new generating units are expected to provide clean, renewable energy for the next 50 years.