Nova Innovation wins permit to build tidal array in Nova Scotia

13 December 2019 (Last Updated December 13th, 2019 12:16)

Tidal energy company Nova Innovation has received an approval to develop a 1.5MW tidal array in Petit Passage in the Bay of Fundy area, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Tidal energy company Nova Innovation has received an approval to develop a 1.5MW tidal array in Petit Passage in the Bay of Fundy area of Nova Scotia, Canada.

Approval for the Canadian project will expand the company’s presence in North America.

The permit follows after Nova Innovation unveiled its plans to build a tidal energy array in October 2019. Nova will build the project in a phased manner, beginning with the installation of a single Nova M100-D (100kW) turbine in 2020 followed by four more.

The array will be developed in three 0.5MW phases, with the first phase further divided into two phases. This will allow the company to monitor environmental effects in each phase.

By 2023, the project will see the installation of 15 new tidal stream turbines on the seabed. Once installed, the turbines will have the capacity to generate clean electricity using natural ebb and flow of the tide. The electricity generated by these turbines will be sufficient to power 600 homes in the region.

Nova Innovation chief executive Simon Forrest said: “In the face of the climate emergency, we are on a mission to transform the power of the oceans across the world into clean, predictable energy.

“At five times the size of our array in Shetland, which is the first of its kind in the world, this project is a massive step forward for Nova Innovation and the sector, propelling Nova Scotia to a leading position in tidal energy.

“We are delighted to have won the contract. It is a testimony to the quality of our team in Canada; the relationships we have built with communities, supply chain and government; and the hard work put in by all that this project will now become a reality.”

The Province of Nova Scotia has committed to pay the company $0.380 per kWh of electricity from the planned 15 turbines.