Moixa joins consortium to develop business models to support V2G technology

27 February 2018 (Last Updated February 27th, 2018 11:56)

UK-based smart battery company Moixa is set to join a consortium to support the growth of vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technologies.

UK-based smart battery company Moixa is set to join a consortium to support the growth of vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technologies.

The consortium includes British multinational electricity and gas utility company National Grid, Western Power Distribution and Nissan’s European Technical Centre.

The new initiative seeks to explore new ways to reward electric car drivers who use their batteries to support the UK’s power grid infrastructure.

“V2G could bring major savings, by managing this demand and reducing the need for costly upgrades.”

Moixa chief technology officer Chris Wright said: “Electric vehicles will play a key role in decarbonising road transport but will put new demands on our power network.

“V2G could bring major savings, by managing this demand and reducing the need for costly upgrades. We can lower the cost of owning electric cars and support growth of this sector by sharing these savings fairly so that drivers benefit from the use of their batteries to support the grid.”

The Vehicle-to-Grid Britain (V2GB) project is part of a competition funded by the Office for Low-Emission Vehicles (OLEV) and the Department for Business Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), in partnership with Innovate UK.

The consortium will focus on new ways to incentivise a rapid release of V2G technology by sharing revenue with key players, including electric vehicle drivers, owners of smart chargers and owners of charging sites such as car parks.

According to an analysis released by energy consultancy firm Element Energy, without V2G, electric vehicles could account for 30% of new car sales by 2030.

Under the new initiative, National Grid and Western Power Distribution will be providing advice on how electric vehicles can support the energy system and the revenue, while Nissan’s European Technical Centre will provide real-life data on driver behaviour.

Moixa, Cenex and the Energy Systems Catapult will support the modelling, which will be led by Element Energy.