Neoen to build renewable power station in South Australia

11 September 2019 (Last Updated September 11th, 2019 15:41)

French renewable energy producer Neoen has announced plans to build a power station in South Australia that will feature wind, solar and battery storage solar facilities.

French renewable energy producer Neoen has announced plans to build a power station in South Australia that will feature wind, solar and battery storage solar facilities.

The Goyder South renewable power station will have the capacity to deliver nearly 1200MW of wind power and 600MW of solar power. Additionally, the facility will have a battery storage capacity of 900MW.

Neoen said that the power station will be built in three phases. The second and third phases will depend on the construction of the $1.03bn (A$1.5bn) SA-NSW inter-connector which will be designed to transmit renewable energy between South Australia and the Eastern seaboard.

South Australia Minister for Energy and Mining Dan van Holst Pellekaan said: “Neoen’s plan for the enormous Goyden South project is a resounding endorsement of the inter-connector and the Marshall Government’s policies for cheaper, more reliable and sustainable power.

“The investment potential of the SA-NSW inter-connector is one of the reasons why the Marshall Liberal Government granted the nation-building infrastructure Major Project Status.

“Modelling released earlier this year shows that small and medium businesses with significant electricity consumption will save many thousands of dollars each year when the inter-connector is energised.”

Once completed, the SA-NSW interconnector line will help to lower the electricity prices and also support the state’s aspiration of net-100% renewables in 2030.

Additionally, four large-scale solar farms are planned along the route, which runs from Robertstown in South Australia and Wagga Wagga in New South Wales.

Pellekaan further added: “South Australia currently only has interconnection with Victoria which puts us at the end of the line and vulnerable to the type system risks that saw the entire state blacked out in 2016.”