New York proposes to make power plants coal-free by 2020

21 May 2018 (Last Updated May 21st, 2018 14:06)

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) in the US has released proposed regulations, which require all power plants in the state to meet new emissions limit for the potent greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) that contributes to climate change.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) in the US has released proposed regulations, which require all power plants in the state to meet new emissions limit for the potent greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) that contributes to climate change.

The regulations are set to achieve New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s goal to end the use of coal in the state’s power plants by 2020.

Cuomo said: “While Washington continues an open assault on our environment, New York is leading the charge with bold climate action to protect our future.

“Coal is a relic of the past, and it’s time to step up, take action, and put an end to our need for fossil fuels.”

“Coal is a relic of the past, and it’s time to step up, take action, and put an end to our need for fossil fuels and focus on cleaner, more green energy solutions for the survival of our planet and future generations.”

The regulations are said to be in line with the Governor’s 2016 State of the State pledge to go coal-free by 2020 as well as his 2018 State of the State instruction to DEC for developing the rules that meet the objectives.

They are expected to further stiffen CO2 performance standards for major electric generating facilities by establishing carbon emission rate requirements in the state.

DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said: “Climate change demands real action, and that is exactly what we are doing here in New York with our new coal regulations.

“Through these regulations, Governor Cuomo is solidifying his role as the nation’s leading environmental champion and helping all New Yorkers realise the economic potential of environmental funding and climate action.”

DEC anticipates that the new regulations would ensure that the remaining coal-fired power plants in the state would make a transition to cleaner, alternative sources of energy or shut down by 2020.