Power Machines manufactures steam turbine for Leningradskaya NPP-2

16 September 2013 (Last Updated September 16th, 2013 18:30)

Russian power plant engineering company Power Machines has produced and tested a 1,200MW high-speed steam turbine, which is destined for Unit 2 of Leningradskaya NPP-2, located in the town of Sosnovy Bor, Russia.

Russian power plant engineering company Power Machines has produced and tested a 1,200MW high-speed steam turbine, which is destined for Unit 2 of Leningradskaya NPP-2, located in the town of Sosnovy Bor, Russia.

In May 2008, the company secured a contract from Atomenergoprom to design, manufacture and supply four complete sets of main turbine hall equipment for Novovoronezhskaya NPP-2 and Leningradskaya NPP-2.

"Russian power plant engineering company Power Machines has produced and tested a 1,200MW high-speed steam turbine."

Under the contract, the company has supplied two power units (with VVER-type reactors of 1,200MW each), steam turbines, condensers and separate auxiliary equipment for turbine plant systems, for each of the nuclear plants, which are being developed under the NPP-2006 project specifications.

The company has manufactured, tested and supplied turbines for Unit 1 and 2 of Novovoronezhskaya NPP-2 in December 2010 and November 2012, respectively, while it supplied the turbine for Unit 1 of Leningradskaya NPP-2 in September 2011.

The NPP-2006 project calls for development of third and next generation power plants, which are required to be designed with VVER reactor with electric power output of at least 1,150MW, with an option of upgrading to 1,200.

The NPP-2006 design enables additional passive safety systems, in combination with traditional active systems, and provides for protection against earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes and aircraft impacts.

Earlier Rosenergoatom secured licenses, which are valid until April 2013, for two units of Leningrad Phase II from Rostekhnadzor, the nuclear regulator.

The Leningrad Phase II reactors are partially intended to replace two reactors of the original four-reactor Leningrad plant, which are scheduled for closure by 2021.

Energy