ABB to upgrade 320MW HVDC transmission link in Sweden for Vattenfall

28 January 2016 (Last Updated January 28th, 2016 18:30)

Swiss power and automation group ABB has secured orders worth more than $22m from Swedish Vattenfall Eldistribution to upgrade a 150-kilovolt (kV) high-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission link in Sweden.

HVDC Gotland

Swiss power and automation group ABB has secured orders worth more than $22m from Swedish Vattenfall Eldistribution to upgrade a 150-kilovolt (kV) high-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission link in Sweden.

The 100km link is the first commercial HVDC link globally, which was installed and commissioned by ABB in 1954.

It starts from Västervik, which is on the east coast of mainland Sweden, and extends till Ygne on the island of Gotland.

Having a capacity for 320MW, the link transmits clean power generated from wind sources on the Swedish island of Gotland to the mainland, and also brings in enough power to meet the energy requirements of 58,000 island residents.

"Having a capacity for 320MW, the link … also brings in enough power to meet the energy requirements of 58,000 island residents."

The planned upgrade of the link is expected to increase its transmission capacity, in order to allow increased wind production on Gotland, to be integrated into the country’s grid.

ABB Grid Systems managing director Patrick Fragman said: "This upgrade project reaffirms our Next Level strategy focus on providing our customers with differentiated value through technology, during the whole life cycle of build-up, operation and maintenance of their assets."

The firm will be installing MACH control and protection system for the upgrade, which will enhance the link’s calculation and integration capabilities, besides increasing its operational life.

The scope of the order includes replacement of ageing equipment and upgrades to the cooling system to increase power supply security for the island.


Image: The link connects Västervik, on the east coast of mainland Sweden, to Ygne, on the island of Gotland. Photo: courtesy of ABB.