Alstom-Marubeni consortium wins €950m contract for power project in Thailand

9 March 2015 (Last Updated March 9th, 2015 18:30)

France-based Alstom and Marubeni Corporation have signed a €950m contract with the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) for construction of a new 600MW unit for the Mae Moh lignite-fired power plant in Thailand.

power plant

France-based Alstom and Marubeni Corporation have signed a €950m contract with the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) for construction of a new 600MW unit for the Mae Moh lignite-fired power plant in Thailand.

The facility is located in the northern Thai province of Lampang and has units 4-13 operational at present, all of which had been installed by the Alstom-Marubeni consortium. The new unit is likely to replace units 4-7 among them.

Alstom will have a €520m share of the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contract.

The consortium, formed by Alstom and Marubeni , is expected to deliver the new 600MW unit for the facility, and conclude the project by 2018.

"Alstom will have a €520m share of the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contract."

Once commissioned, the unit will turn the Mae Moh power plant into the first lignite-fired power plant in Asia operating with ultra-supercritical conditions.

Under the terms of the agreement, Alstom will offer its technological expertise for the project in the form of an ultra-supercritical boiler with integrated selective catalytic reduction of NOx (SCR), and ultra-supercritical steam turbine and generator.

The company will also deliver air quality control systems for the facility, which will include a wet flue gas desulphurisation (WFGD) system for reducing sulphur oxides by more than 98%, and electrostatic precipitators (ESP) to capture particulate and dust emissions.

Marubeni will be responsible for the rest of the equipment to be installed at the facility, and the civil / installation works.

The new installation is expected to increase the efficiency of the power plant, and raise its output. It is also likely to bring down more than 20% of CO2 emissions for per unit of fuel burned, as compared to other installations.


Image: Illustration of ultra-supercritical lignite-fired power plant. Photo: Alstom.