Atlantis’ MeyGen tidal power scheme in Scotland generates first power

16 November 2016 (Last Updated November 16th, 2016 18:30)

Global tidal power generation company Atlantis’ MeyGen project site in the Pentland Firth has begun producing power.

Global tidal power generation company Atlantis’ MeyGen project site in the Pentland Firth has begun producing power.

Last week, the first of four 1.5MW Andritz Hydro Hammerfest (AHH)-supplied tidal stream turbines was installed at the Scotland-based site by James Fisher Marine Services. It was then plugged to a pre-laid cable connecting back to the onshore control centre and grid export point.

AHH also performed operational trials of the on-board safety and monitoring systems before starting the process of powering up the turbine to tune the control system for optimised generation.

"The success of this first phase is a foundation for the tidal industry to build upon to ensure we develop a new energy sector which can deliver clean, predictable, and affordable power."

Atlantis' CEO Tim Cornelius said: “This is the moment we have been working towards since we first identified the MeyGen site back in 2007 and I am immensely proud of and grateful for the remarkable team of people who have contributed to this milestone,  our suppliers, our funders, our supportive shareholders, and of course the project team, whose commitment, tenacity and belief have been without equal.

“I look forward to bringing more news of the project development over the coming weeks and months as we move into the full operational phase.

“The success of this first phase is a foundation for the tidal industry to build upon to ensure we develop a new energy sector which can deliver clean, predictable, and affordable power from the UK’s own abundant resources.”

An extensive onshore turbine testing and commissioning regime will now be conducted prior to final deployment for the first 6MW phase of a total build out of almost 400MW.

Construction for the next 6MW phase is expected to begin next year and has received a €17m grant from the European Commission’s NER300 fund.