Bio-energy plant supplies 8% power for Nestle’s factory in UK

18 November 2014 (Last Updated November 18th, 2014 18:30)

The on-site bio-energy plant for Nestle's Fawdon confectionery factory, near Newcastle, UK, is providing 8% of the factory's power requirements, Clearfleau has revealed.

fawdon plant Nestle

The on-site bio-energy plant for Nestle’s Fawdon confectionery factory, near Newcastle, UK, is providing 8% of the factory’s power requirements, Clearfleau has revealed.

UK-based Clearfleau firm is the developer of the energy plant.

Commissioned a year ago, the plant converts 200,000l of feedstock into renewable energy daily, eliminating the solid waste handling costs for Nestlé and reducing its carbon footprint.

As well as the wash waters from the site, the feedstock also include 1,200t of residual by-products and ingredients yearly.

The power generated from the facility reduces almost £100,000 of yearly electricity bill for Nestle’s confectionary factory. The registered feed in tariff for the site also ensures annual payments of about £250,000 in a year.

Nestle head of sustainability unit Inder Poonaji said: "We chose an innovative British bio-energy technology provider because we wanted a partner with experience who would design a plant to meet our specific needs.

"On-site treatment of production residues will help us reduce the wider environmental impact of our business and meet our sustainability goals. By working with Clearfleau, we continue to reduce our carbon footprint and generate value from food production residues."

"Clearfleau was delighted to be selected by Nestlé to deliver this important plant and we very much appreciate their collaborative approach to the delivery of this project."

Clearfleau chief executive Craig Chapman said: "Clearfleau was delighted to be selected by Nestle to deliver this important plant and we very much appreciate their collaborative approach to the delivery of this project.

"For Nestle, what was previously a processing overhead is now a valuable financial and environmental asset.

"The advantages of anaerobic digestion are becoming more apparent and we are currently building AD plants on dairy, distillery, food and biofuel manufacturing sites. As a consequence of this industry support, we have built a strong team delivering on-site anaerobic digestion facilities."

If the present rate continues, Nestle’s investment in the anaerobic digestion (AD) plant is likely to be paid pack within four to five years, Clearfleau informed.


Image: The power generated from the facility reduces almost £100,000 of yearly electricity bill for Nestle’s confectionery factory. Photo: courtesy of Clearfleau.

Energy