Gamesa and Santander to develop 500MW wind projects in Mexico

4 March 2014 (Last Updated March 4th, 2014 18:30)

Spanish wind turbine maker Gamesa and Mexico-based Santander have entered into an agreement to jointly develop a series of wind power projects with a total installed capacity of around 500MW in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico.

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Spanish wind turbine maker Gamesa and Mexico-based Santander have entered into an agreement to jointly develop a series of wind power projects with a total installed capacity of around 500MW in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico.

Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, Gamesa will be responsible for the development and construction of the wind farms and the supply and installation of all the projects' wind turbines. The company will develop the projects over the course of the next three years.

Gamesa will develop the 500MW projects under the self-supply regime and under the framework of Open Season II, which is being spearheaded and coordinated by the Mexican Comisión Reguladora de Energía and Comisión Federal de Electricidad.

According to Gamesa, this agreement - to which Santander is contributing El Sauzal (200MW) - positions both companies as the most important investor group in the Mexican wind energy sector.

"The contract also includes operation and maintenance services of the plant for a period of five years."

Until now, Gamesa has installed more than 1,000MW of wind power capacity in Mexico. Under operations and maintenance agreements, the company also services approximately 800MW in the country. In its capacity as a developer, it has built 244MW and has a pipeline of around 550MW.

In February 2014, the company reached an agreement with Sweden-based Eolus Vind to supply four of its G114-2.0MW turbines for the Nötåsen wind farm, located in municipality of Sundsvall. Under the agreement, the company will supply, install and commission the 8MW turbines at the power plant, starting summer 2014.

The contract also includes operation and maintenance services of the plant for a period of five years.


Image: Wind farm in Mexico with Gamesa's WTG installed. Photo: courtesy of Gamesa

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