Germany may shutdown coal-fired plants to meet greenhouse gas reduction targets

30 October 2014 (Last Updated October 30th, 2014 18:30)

Germany plans to reduce energy generation from coal power plants to meet its greenhouse gas emission targets.

Germany plans to reduce energy generation from coal power plants to meet its greenhouse gas emission targets.

The government is considering a programme to increase energy efficiency and reduce coal generation, reports Reuters citing Rainer Baake, a Greens member serving under Social Democrat Economy Minister. It is claimed that this decision will be made on 3 December.

Germany has a goal to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2020 from 1990 levels. The country's environment industry has warned that this target could be missed by approximately 5%-8%.

If this were to happen, it could be major embarrassment for Angela Merkel. The chancellor has made Energiewende a pet project, in order to shift the country's dependency from nuclear and coal power plants to renewable sources.

EU recommendations for at least 40% greenhouse gas reduction in 2030 is, however, more relaxed than the country's targets.

"The government is considering a programme to increase energy efficiency and reduce coal generation."

Baake told: "We are looking at whether it could be sensible to take a certain amount of coal power plant capacity out of the market and put it in a reserve."

National weekly news publication Der Spiegel had reported earlier this week that the German Government intends to eliminate 10GW of coal-fired power, which equals power generation from almost two dozen small plants.

Merkel's government has set a target of generating 40% to 45% of power from renewable sources by 2025, and 55% to 60% by 2035.

At present, coal is a major power generation resource in the country. Until last year, coal-fired plants offered almost 45% of national energy requirements.

Energy