Nautricity deploys first CoRMaT tidal turbine in UK

12 May 2014 (Last Updated May 12th, 2014 18:30)

UK-based Nautricity has deployed its first commercial scale contra rotating marine turbine (CoRMaT) tidal turbine at the European Marine Energy Centre's Shapinsay Sound test site , in Orkney.

Cormat

UK-based Nautricity has deployed its first commercial scale contra rotating marine turbine (CoRMaT) tidal turbine at the European Marine Energy Centre's Shapinsay Sound test site , in Orkney.

The turbine was installed at the centre in Orkney this week after an extensive round of investment and up-scaling.

The company has spent 18 months developing its first commercial scale device, which has a rotor span of 10m, and is significantly bigger than early test models.

Using a £250,000 Smart Scotland grant from Scottish Enterprise, Nautricity has developed and patented a tethered based mooring system, known as HydroBuoy that ensures the CoRMaT devices remain steady in strong currents.

Nautricity co-founder and CEO Cameron Johnstone said that testing the device at full-scale in real-life conditions was an important move and this proceeds to full commercial deployment.

"Nautricity said that its latest technology uses a novel, contra-rotating rotor system to cost-effectively harness tidal energy."

Johnstone said, "Once we have demonstrated the technology here and shown that it can provide affordable electricity, we will then build out to multi-megawatt arrays at home and overseas. In order to be able to compete abroad in the future, it's essential that we have a robust, indigenous market from which to launch our international business development.

"We believe we are doing all of the right things in developing lower cost, next-generation technology, through our progressive testing program and gathering the data to ensure that we are taking to market a product that works and can compete with other forms of energy generation."

The CoRMaT technology is a lighter and more compact device, tethered to the seabed and held in tension by a sub-surface float.

Nautricity said that its latest technology uses a novel, contra-rotating rotor system to cost-effectively harness tidal energy.

The turbines can be deployed in depths of up to 500m and, because they are closely spaced and contra-rotating rotors move in opposite directions, they remain steady in the face of strong tidal flows.


Image: Nautricity deploys full scale tidal turbine in UK. Photo: courtesy of European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC).

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