Network Rail and Bio-bean to produce green energy from station coffee waste
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Network Rail and Bio-bean to produce green energy from station coffee waste

13 Jul 2015

Bio-bean and Network Rail have extended their partnership to start a new recycling project that will turn coffee waste into fuel and will be used to cut down the costs for railway in the UK.

biobean UK railway

Bio-bean and Network Rail have extended their partnership to start a new recycling project that will turn coffee waste into fuel and will be used to cut down the costs for railway in the UK.

The firms had conducted successful trials for the technology at London’s Victoria and Waterloo stations, and now plan to extend it to across six largest railway stations in the country.

Euston, King’s Cross, Liverpool Street, Paddington, Victoria and Waterloo, all in the UK capital London, generate nearly 700 tonnes of coffee waste every year.

The railway operator has decided that instead of sending it to landfill, the waste will be sent to a Bio-bean facility to generate more than 650 tonnes of carbon-neutral biofuels for heating homes, offices and factories.

"Bio-bean and Network Rail have extended their partnership to start a new recycling project that will turn coffee waste into fuel and will be used to cut down the costs for railway in the UK."

This initiative can even stop the yearly release of over 5,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

More than 5,700kWh of energy can be generated from each tonne of coffee waste.

About 700 tonnes of coffees waste derived from the six stations will thus be able to meet the energy demand for nearly 1000 UK homes in a year.

Network Rail property managing director David Biggs said: "Millions of cups of coffee are bought in our stations every year and that number is growing as passenger numbers continue to rise.

"This partnership will see the waste from those purchases put to good use, creating biofuels that can be used in vehicles and to heat homes and saving more than 5,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere.

"It’s good news that our stations are cutting their carbon footprint while also saving passengers and taxpayers money.

"The new solution is cheaper than sending the waste to landfill, which means we can invest more in making the railway better for the four million people who travel by rail each day."


Image: 700 tonnes of coffee wastes are generated across six major railway stations in London, Photo: courtesy of Network Rail.