Siemens begins construction on remote diagnostics center for wind turbines in Denmark

4 February 2014 (Last Updated February 4th, 2014 18:30)

Siemens Energy Service has commenced construction on a new 1,400sqm remote diagnostics center for wind turbines at its Danish wind service headquarters in Brande.

RDC

Siemens Energy Service has commenced construction on a new 1,400sqm remote diagnostics center for wind turbines at its Danish wind service headquarters in Brande.

The highly-advanced facility is claimed to be one of the most advanced wind turbine remote diagnostics service centers in the world.

To be operational in last quarter of 2014, the facility will host diagnostic operations and monitoring services for more than 7,500 installed Siemens turbines worldwide to help those units operate at their optimum levels of performance.

Siemens Wind Power Service head Torben Bang said as a global leader in the operation and maintenance of wind power plants, it is important for the company to continue to advance its services and innovations to meet its customers' needs.

Bang said, "Our highly advanced, industry-leading RDS operations enable us to support those efforts by monitoring our global Siemens fleet 24/7/365 and flagging potential issues before they become serious.

"Remote diagnostics is a key component of a smarter and integrated service approach that helps our customers lower the overall cost of energy."

"The highly-advanced facility is claimed to be one of the most advanced wind turbine remote diagnostics service centers in the world."

Through remote diagnostics, which is a key part of Siemens' portfolio of value-added services, monitoring experts can solve more than 85% of all alarms remotely without a team fixing on-site, which will result in reduced downtime and the number of turbine visits, while enhancing higher energy output.

Vibration diagnostics will help Siemens find the smallest indicator that may not be operating normally and follow up by recommending proactive solutions before the issue becomes serious.

Siemens claims that it could analyse the data collected to draw trends on individual turbines in addition to the overall fleet and those results will help enhance current and future designs and improve existing turbine performance in the long term.

Having tested in 1998, the company installed the first condition monitoring system for wind turbines in 2000 and has since continuously developed the technology.


Image: Siemens breaks ground on new remote diagnostics for wind turbines. Photo: courtesy of Siemens.

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