Tonik Energy and Powervault to test new energy storage smart tariff model for UK

9 April 2017 (Last Updated April 9th, 2017 18:30)

Renewable energy supplier Tonik Energy has collaborated with Powervault to test the potential of a new energy storage smart tariff model for UK households.

Renewable energy supplier Tonik Energy has collaborated with Powervault to test the potential of a new energy storage smart tariff model for UK households.

The two companies have collaborated to increase the use of batteries in homes across the UK, significantly reducing electricity bills.

As part of the project, Powervault’s domestic storage units will be trialled with Tonik Energy customers, which have smart metres. The two companies will evaluate the use of energy storage in combination with a smart tariff.

Tonik Energy's managing director Chris Russell said: “The next decade is going to see huge change as homeowners get genuine insight into energy usage combined with access to smart, in-home, energy efficient technologies that will help you use less energy, access cheaper energy, and generate your own energy.

"We believe it is entirely possible for the customer to save money and be good to the planet without compromising on home comforts."

“It is hugely exciting, therefore, to be collaborating with a like-minded company such as Powervault, who shares our ambition to be at the forefront of this move towards a more sustainable future.

“We believe it is entirely possible for the customer to save money and be good to the planet without compromising on home comforts.”

Tonik Energy will use technology and data to reduce the power bills of its customers to half by 2022, while the two firms jointly aim to offer proof of concept for the UK’s first storage tariff that will provide the householders with the ability to store energy drawn down at off-peak times.

By automatically charging when demand is low and electricity is cheap, such as at night, and by discharging during peak times, Powervault will be able to reduce the energy bills of the UK households by up to 35%.