Toshiba starts testing independent energy supply system in Japan

19 April 2015 (Last Updated April 19th, 2015 18:30)

Japanese firm Toshiba has started testing its recently developed independent energy supply system, H2One, at Kawasaki Marien public facility and Higashi-Ogishima-Naka Park in the country in co-ordination with the city authorities.

Japanese firm Toshiba has started testing its recently developed independent energy supply system, H2One, at Kawasaki Marien public facility and Higashi-Ogishima-Naka Park in the country in co-ordination with the city authorities.

The system is a combined technology based on photovoltaic installations, storage batteries, hydrogen-producing water electrolysis equipment, hydrogen and water tanks, and fuel cells. It is based on renewable energy and uses hydrogen as fuel for power generation.

H2One uses the generated power through photovoltaic installations to electrolyse water and extract hydrogen from it. The derived hydrogen is stored in tanks and used in fuel cells to generate power and residual and hot water.

The demonstration has been initiated at the two locations to promote Kawasaki Port, one of the designated emergency evacuation areas in Japan. The installations are expected to be of help during emergency situations in absence of lifeline since it can produce power and hot water using sunlight and water as fuel.

"H2One uses the generated power through photovoltaic installations to electrolyse water and extract hydrogen from it."

The system has capacity to provide for 300 evacuees for around a week during crisis. It also enables easy transportation through trailers as it comes inside a container.

A hydrogen energy management system also comes with the system, which can assist during peak shifts under normal circumstances. It can bring down the high demand of mains power through optimised control of hydrogen production, power generation and storage.

The Japanese technology company intends to increase the hydrogen storage capabilities of the system to develop a self-contained solution of local power generation for local usage.

The pilot has been designed to assess the scope for a hydrogen-based emergency electric power and hot-water supply system and a hydrogen energy management system in normal operating circumstances at both the sites. It is also likely to give a boost to system efficiency.