UK may reject proposal for Navitus Bay offshore windfarm

6 September 2015 (Last Updated September 6th, 2015 18:30)

The UK is set to reject construction of the 970MW Navitus Bay offshore wind project over concerns about the jurassic coast losing its UNESCO World Heritage status.

The UK is set to reject construction of the 970MW Navitus Bay offshore wind project over concerns about the jurassic coast losing its UNESCO World Heritage status.

While the project developers are seeking planning permission for the work, authorities are expected to reject the proposal.

Refusal by the ministers follows ‘an unprecedented recommendation by the Planning Inspectorate that permission should be refused,’ reports The Telegraph.

Dutch energy group Eneco Holding and French EDF’s green energy unit have a 50:50 share in the project through Navitus Bay Development consortium.

"We believe in the strength of our proposal, which showcases how Navitus Bay would make an important contribution to the local economy."

The offshore project was initially expected to have 121 turbine installations for a 970MW power generation capacity, and 78 turbines under a Plan B to have 630MW capacity.

Critics of the project argue that the turbines, which are expected to reach a height of 650ft, will ruin the views, affect tourism, and may result in loss of the jurassic coast’s UNESCO World Heritage Site status.

The project has encountered unexpected controversies and has had more objections submitted to the Planning Inspectorate than any other offshore windfarm to date, the news daily said.

If operational, the project could meet the energy requirements of nearly 700,000 UK households. It is expected to deliver up to £1.6bn as economic benefit for the region, and create up 1,700 jobs during construction.

Navitus Bay project director Stuart Grant was quoted by The Telegraph as saying: "We believe in the strength of our proposal, which showcases how Navitus Bay would make an important contribution to the local economy and to the UK’s renewable energy and carbon reduction targets."