Voith completes work on 95MW hydro power plant in Iceland

9 March 2014 (Last Updated March 9th, 2014 18:30)

Voith has completed work on the 95MW Budarhals hydro power plant in Iceland. The project has been commissioned during an opening ceremony on 7 March 2014, which was held by Voith and Landsvirkjun, the national power company in Iceland.

Voith Hydro

Voith has completed work on the 95MW Budarhals hydro power plant in Iceland. The project has been commissioned during an opening ceremony on 7 March 2014, which was held by Voith and Landsvirkjun, the national power company in Iceland.

The company has supplied and installed two Kaplan turbines, which has water-filled runner hubs. It also provided generators with the latest technology using brushless thyristor controlled exciters.

Voith's project work also included the supply of powerhouse cranes and station control systems.

Landsvirkjun Budarhals project manager Gudlaugur Thorarinsson said, "All works on the project has been diligently completed in spite of harsh winter weathers and an ambitious time schedule, while the company is satisfied with the performance of Voith."

Successful completion of the project represents a long term continuation of business activity in Iceland, Voith said.

The first design for the Budarhals hydropower plant was performed by Landsvirkjun in 1989 and later developed to the present design.

"Voith's project work also included the supply of powerhouse cranes and station control systems."

Following the economic and financial crisis in 2008, Budarhals was the first major infrastructure project being built.

Voith Financial Services financing structure was an important support for the hydropower project, as it assisted Landsvirkjun in funding.

According to the 'World Atlas Hydropower & Dam 2013', with Budarhals hydroelectric project Iceland has total installed hydro capacity of 1,980MW.

In 2011, hydropower plants have contributed approximately 73% to the national electricity output by generating 12,507GWh of power.


Image: A winter landscape with the hydropower plant Budarhals, Iceland. Photo: courtesy of Landsvirkjun.

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