Xcel Energy proposes to add 3,380MW with 11 new windfarms in US

22 March 2017 (Last Updated March 22nd, 2017 18:30)

US-based electric services company Xcel Energy has proposed development of 11 new windfarms.

Xcel Energy proposes to add 3,380MW with 11 new windfarms in US

US-based electric services company Xcel Energy has proposed development of 11 new windfarms.

The new facilities will be built in seven US states, adding a combined generation capacity of 3,380MW to the company’s existing portfolio.

Xcel Energy's chairman, president, and chief executive officer (CEO) Ben Fowke said: “We’re investing big in wind because of the tremendous economic value it brings to our customers.

“With wind energy at historic low prices, we can secure savings that will benefit customers now and for decades to come.

“Our plan delivers on both economic and environmental fronts, as we provide customers the cleaner, renewable resources they want, while continuing to deliver the reliable and low-cost energy they need.”

Having proposed for both owned farms and power purchase agreements, Xcel Energy expects to develop the projects over the next five years.

"We’re investing big in wind because of the tremendous economic value it brings to our customers."

Fowke added: “Our plans allow us to harness the wind-rich resources we have in the states we serve and deliver outstanding economic value to our customers, while delivering emissions-free energy that will reduce our carbon footprint.”

In Southwest US, Xcel Energy proposes to build the 522MW Sagamore Wind project in New Mexico and the 478MW Hale Wind and 230MW Bonita facilities in Texas.

In addition, the company proposed to develop seven new projects in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Iowa in the Upper Midwest.

Xcel Energy also proposes to construct a 600MW Rush Creek self-build project windpower project in Cheyenne, Elbert, Kit Carson, and Lincoln Counties.

Currently, all proposed windpower projects are in various stages of regulatory approval.


Image: Wind turbine. Photo: courtesy of Mary Bonney / Freeimages.com..