Northern Powergrid uses smart meter data to reduce network losses

2 March 2018 (Last Updated March 2nd, 2018 10:25)

UK-based electrical distribution company Northern Powergrid has disclosed a six-stage programme that aims to minimise losses and reduce carbon emissions on electricity networks.

UK-based electrical distribution company Northern Powergrid has disclosed a six-stage programme that aims to minimise losses and reduce carbon emissions on electricity networks.

Northern Powergrid distributes power across the North East, Yorkshire and northern Lincolnshire. The company will use smart meter data to identify high loss network areas and implement appropriate measures to address the issues.

The programme is designed to improve the company’s understanding of any technical losses and improve loss reduction across its electricity network, which provides power to 3.9 million homes and businesses.

“The smart meter is bringing a huge data bonus to those of us involved with loss reduction, enabling us to tackle this issue head-on.”

Northern Powergrid smart grid implementation head Mark Nicholson said: “Our programme for losses is underpinned by our ambition to improve our understanding of this complex area.

“Losses are currently seen as an unavoidable reality of network operation. The smart meter is bringing a huge data bonus to those of us involved with loss reduction, enabling us to tackle this issue head-on and reduce unnecessary carbon emissions from wasted electricity.”

The installation of smart meters across the country and incorporating new network monitoring techniques is reported to have helped the company to make significant advances in data availability.

Through its six-step strategy, the company will use the data to forecast and minimise losses on its power distribution network and will ensure a prioritised response to replacement work to improve its network.

Nicholson further added: “The national smart meter roll-out and the associated move to a half-hourly market settlement processes will introduce more accurate metering point data. We hope this near-real-time data availability will mean technical losses can be more readily evaluated.

“Incorporating this data evaluation, and making use of both existing and new data, allows us to move innovative ideas that will deliver improvements to the operational every day.”