Ocean Wind and Aker bid to develop offshore projects in Scotland
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Ocean Wind and Aker bid to develop offshore projects in Scotland

15 Sep 2021 (Last Updated September 15th, 2021 15:19)

The companies plan to use steel-based semi-submersible floaters from Principle Power for the development.

Ocean Winds (OW) and Aker Offshore Wind (AOW) have submitted a joint bid as part of the ScotWind process to deliver 6GW of floating offshore wind capacity.

The Crown Estate Scotland’s ScotWind process grants property rights for the seabed in Scottish waters for commercial-scale offshore wind projects.

OW and AOW’s proposal for several sites in the Outer Moray Firth seeks to use floating devices to generate 6GW of power.

This would be the largest wind energy development in the UK and would be enough capacity to power millions of homes.

The companies plan to use Principle Power’s Windfloat steel-based semi-submersible floaters for the development.

The project is expected to create thousands of jobs in the region.

AOW UK managing director Sian Lloyd-Rees said: “Our vision is for Scotland to become a global leader in floating offshore wind, contributing to our net-zero mission with green energy at scale.

“We can create thousands of highly skilled local jobs through billions of pounds of investment in local supply chains and infrastructure.

“Our bid would deliver for the next generation by harnessing the green power and extraordinary potential of Scotland’s deepwater resources.”

OW and AOW will outline their bid at the Floating Offshore Wind conference this week.

OW developed the 950MW Moray East wind farm, currently the largest wind farm in Scotland.

The company is a 50-50 joint venture of EDP Renewables and Engie.

AOW has been active in Scotland since the 1980s and has been engaged in building ships and designing, constructing and servicing offshore installations.

Ocean Winds UK managing director Dan Finch said: “The transition to net-zero means that we need to open new areas of the sea for offshore wind development.

“We have the skills, experience and technology to take offshore wind out of the Moray Firth and into the deep waters of the North Sea using floating technology.”