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September 1, 2020updated 09 Sep 2020 9:59am

Ørsted launches immersive training programme in UK

Denmark-based wind farm development company Ørsted has launched an immersive safety training programme in the UK.

By Matt Farmer

Denmark-based wind farm development company Ørsted has launched an immersive safety training programme in the UK.

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Wind Power Market seeing increased risk and disruption

The wind power market has grown at a CAGR of 14% between 2010 and 2021 to reach 830 GW by end of 2021. This has largely been possible due to favourable government policies that have provided incentives to the sector. This has led to an increase in the share of wind in the capacity mix, going from a miniscule 4% in 2010 to 10% in 2021. This is further set to rise to 15% by 2030. However, the recent commodity price increase has hit the sector hard, increasing risks for wind turbine manufacturers and project developers, and the Russia-Ukraine crisis has caused further price increase and supply chain disruption. In light of this, GlobalData has identified which countries are expected to add the majority of wind power capacity out to 2030. Get ahead and download this whitepaper for more details on the current state of the Wind Power Market.
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The company purpose-built a facility in the Humberside region of the UK for $1.9m (£1.4m). Ørsted partnered with immersive training company Active Training Team (ATT), which designed the facility and the ‘Thrive’ programme.

Immersive training involves workers in role-play, using actors to simulate practical situations on a worksite.

ATT co-director Dermot Kerrigan told Power Technology: “It’s a multi-set, multi-media theatre experience in which participants experience a fatal incident at a wind industry dockside. By then being taken through a variety of immersive sets the attendees come to an understanding of the organisational and cultural antecedents that led to the incident as well as its consequences.”

The company originally designed the sessions to accommodate 39 trainees. However, Covid-19 restrictions have limited sessions to 18 trainees per day and the company continues to review this number.

Ørsted will train all workers for the upcoming Hornsea Two offshore wind farm project at the facility. The project involves the construction of 165 turbines, 89km off the coast of the UK.

Ørsted see training facility as ‘legacy’ of development

Senior construction project manager for Hornsea Two and project manager for development of the Thrive facility Jason Ledden said: “Safety is a core value and as such, it has been extremely difficult to postpone the roll-out of this pivotal training. We’ve reduced numbers and introduced safety measures to ensure that our programme is fully compliant with government guidelines under these difficult circumstances.

“We hope that other industries across the Humber will utilise this new exciting resource which aims to bring about behavioural changes in attitudes towards safety.”

ATT’s Kerrigan continued: “As well as the wind power version of the programme, for use by Ørsted’s Hornsea Two and other clients in the renewables sector, we also look forward to hosting bespoke versions of the programme for a variety of industries in the region – and beyond.”

The Thrive scheme will remain available to other companies and sectors after its completion, with the ability to custom-make different training scenarios. The CEO of Associated British Ports has already committed his company to using the scheme.

ATT said Thrive draws on techniques similar to those used by the Thames Tideway project, a sewer construction scheme in London. So far, the project has not had any lost-time injuries in its four years of construction.

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Free Report
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Wind Power Market seeing increased risk and disruption

The wind power market has grown at a CAGR of 14% between 2010 and 2021 to reach 830 GW by end of 2021. This has largely been possible due to favourable government policies that have provided incentives to the sector. This has led to an increase in the share of wind in the capacity mix, going from a miniscule 4% in 2010 to 10% in 2021. This is further set to rise to 15% by 2030. However, the recent commodity price increase has hit the sector hard, increasing risks for wind turbine manufacturers and project developers, and the Russia-Ukraine crisis has caused further price increase and supply chain disruption. In light of this, GlobalData has identified which countries are expected to add the majority of wind power capacity out to 2030. Get ahead and download this whitepaper for more details on the current state of the Wind Power Market.
by GlobalData
Enter your details here to receive your free Report.

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