Report finds automation and digitalisation creating happier power professionals

21 February 2018 (Last Updated February 21st, 2018 12:36)

The second edition of energy recruitment and employment trends report Global Energy Talent Index (GETI) has claimed that automation and digitalisation are creating an optimistic workforce. 

The second edition of energy recruitment and employment trends report Global Energy Talent Index (GETI) has claimed that automation and digitalisation are creating an optimistic workforce.

GETI is organised by workforce solutions provider Airswift and energy and engineering job site Energy Jobline.

The report surveyed more than 20,000 energy professionals and found that happiness among power professionals is rising faster than any other energy sector, with 45% stating they are happier than they were three years ago.

Some reasons for increased happiness were digitalisation, access to cutting-edge technology and flexible working hours.

“Professionals from all sectors identify job insecurity as a risk of digitalisation. In power, there is a significant majority that’s very worried by this.”

With the rollout of smart meters and advancement of battery storage technology, the energy sector has seen some of the most evident digital progression in recent years.

GETI finds that 79% of power sector professionals and 83% of employers consider digitalisation as a positive development.

In the report, employees and hiring managers agreed that digitalisation has supported efficiency, increased productivity and reduced risk.

Airswift chief operating officer Janette Marx said: “The power sector has had to digitalise faster than others, so we should pay attention to what workers and hirers highlight as benefits.

“The fact that more personal benefits such as flexible working take a backseat to broader, organisational gains like efficiency and productivity, shows us that digitalisation is more than hype, it really is transformative.”

Despite the power sector’s positive enthusiasm of digitalisation, concerns do remain. Half of the professionals questioned consider job insecurity as a negative outcome and 47% of respondents were concerned about the reduction of human judgement.

The power industry also had the highest percentage of professionals being ‘very concerned’ that the rise of automation and digitalisation could replace the need for their role in the future.

Energy Jobline managing director Hannah Peet said:  “Professionals from all sectors identify job insecurity as a risk of digitalisation. In power, there is a significant majority that’s very worried by this.

“However, for the most part, this is based on a misperception. Digitalisation is likely to change their role, but not replace it. Training programmes and education should help most workers adapt to a more digital future.”