Scotland commissions study to evaluate potential of floating wind projects

12 January 2018 (Last Updated January 12th, 2018 11:07)

Crown Estate Scotland has launched a new study to assess the potential economic benefits of adding more floating wind projects.

Scotland commissions study to evaluate potential of floating wind projects
The Hywind Scotland floating windfarm. Credit: © Crown Estate Scotland.

Crown Estate Scotland has launched a new study to assess the potential economic benefits of adding more floating wind projects.

To be overseen by a UK-wide group, including Crown Estate Scotland, The Crown Estate, RenewableUK, Scottish Renewables and the Offshore Wind Industry Council, the £50,000 project will look in detail at different scenarios based on different scales of development and potential in Scotland.

Conducted by Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) Catapult on behalf of Crown Estate Scotland, the assessment is expected to enable the UK Government to frame policies to support the growth of offshore wind industry.

Crown Estate Scotland senior development manager Sian Wilson said: “We want to find out the scale of the economic benefits, jobs, supply chain and exports, from growing the Scottish floating wind industry.

“The assessment is expected to enable the UK Government to frame policies to support the growth of offshore wind industry.”

“As the low-carbon economy grows and the world needs more renewable, green energy, there is potentially a great opportunity for Scotland and the wider UK in ensuring we make the most of our competitive advantage.”

ORE Catapult insights head Gavin Smart said: “Innovations in turbine foundations and the development of floating wind technologies are key to opening up enormous new wind resources in expanses of water too deep for conventional, bottom-fixed farms.

“This, in turn, creates huge economic opportunities for Scottish companies to capitalise on this emerging market, both here in Scotland and through the export of skills and technologies globally.”

The study is scheduled to be finalised and published later this year.