The big freeze: new issue of Power Technology out now
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The big freeze: new issue of Power Technology out now

03 Jun 2021

In this issue: lessons from Texas' power shutdown, making wind turbines from wood, Brazil’s $5.4bn green hydrogen plant, and more.

The big freeze: new issue of Power Technology out now

In this issue, Swedish company Modvion has constructed a wood-based wind turbine demonstration unit, aiming to provide similar durability to metal designs with lighter and cheaper materials. Modvion’s purchase by the ventures arm of turbine giant Vestas means the business seems set to scale-up in coming years. Is the future of onshore wind in wood?

Also, Enegix Energy has announced plans to build the world’s largest green hydrogen plant in Brazil, a $5.4bn project that will produce more than 600 million kilograms of green hydrogen annually, from a baseload of 3.4GW of renewable power. The titanic project could help green hydrogen realise its oft-touted potential, and could set a precedent for future green hydrogen facilities.

Furthermore, the devastating winter storm that hit Texas in February sent energy prices skyrocketing, did huge damage to power infrastructure, and also made the Bank of America hundreds of millions of dollars in trading revenue. We dig deeper into what happened, why developing countries are worried, and who stands to profit from such calamities.

Whether you are on a desktop, tablet or smartphone, you can read the magazine for free online, and join the conversation on Twitter.


In this issue 

Reach for the sky: a tale of wood and wind

Why would Danish wind turbine manufacturer Vestas acquire Modvion, a Swedish wood technology company? Together, the companies hope to raise the roof of wind power generation by getting back to their roots. Matt Farmer explains why their plans for mass manufacture of wooden wind turbine towers could change the fabric of wind energy.

Read more.

The future of smart home energy

With energy innovations quickly spreading to more areas of our lives, the future of smart home energy is quickly advancing before our eyes. Yoana Cholteeva consults with experts to explore the current potential of smart home energy, what the key barriers are, and the measures that the industry can take to mitigate them ahead of time.

Read more.

Green hydrogen, green energy: inside Brazil’s $5.4bn green hydrogen plant

Enegix plans to build the world’s largest green hydrogen plant in Brazil, a $5.4bn project that will produce more than 600 million kilograms of green hydrogen annually. JP Casey asks: could the facility prove Brazil’s commitment to clean power, and that green hydrogen can work on a large scale?

Read more.

 

 

Reforming energy systems, 30 minutes at a time

The British energy grid has used hourly estimates to match predicted energy supply with real watts for the last 20 years. With smart meters and new algorithms, energy regulators have started preparations to double their measurements. Matt Farmer asks the regulators: how much difference can half-hourly settlement make? 

Read more.

The Great State of Texas: explaining the power crisis and what happens next

The devastating winter storm that hit Texas in February sent energy prices skyrocketing, did huge damage to power infrastructure, and also made the Bank of America hundreds of millions of dollars. Matthew Hall digs deeper into what happened, who stood to profit from the crisis, and why a freak incident in Texas has other countries concerned.

Read more.

Open source energy: could collaboration drive the clean energy transition?

Technological innovations have led not only to new ways of producing power, but new ways of working, and encouraging collaboration between companies. LF Energy aims to bring actors across the energy sector together to drive technological and cultural change in power, but, JP Casey asks: can it bear fruit?

Read more.

Preview – Future Power Technology July 2021

In the first half of 2020, lightning struck Vestas for €135m of costs. The company claimed that a ‘limited number of models’ were to blame for the high incidence of lightning, and that it would work on a turbine-by-turbine basis to correct problems. If lightning strikes, what sort of issues can it cause for wind turbines? 

Also next issue, we examine Nova Innovation’s development of a tidal-powered electric vehicle charging point and look at what an expansion of hydrogen vehicles could mean for the UK’s renewables capacity.

Plus, we learn about the technology behind salinity gradients, dive into Japan’s decision to release more than a million tonnes of “treated” water from Fukushima, and speak to the IASS to learn more about the challenges facing low-income countries post-Covid-19.