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February 18, 2019updated 02 Jul 2020 11:27pm

Ørsted’s Hornsea 1 offshore windfarm begins power generation

Danish company Ørsted has announced that the first turbine has been installed at Hornsea 1 offshore windfarm and is now producing electricity. 

Danish company Ørsted has announced that the first turbine has been installed at Hornsea 1 offshore windfarm and is now producing electricity.

Once fully operational, the windfarm will have the capacity to supply clean energy to more than one million UK homes. Hornsea 1 is double the size of the world’s current largest offshore windfarm, Walney Extension (1,218MW), which is also off the UK coast.

Hornsea 1 is a joint venture (JV) between Ørsted and the US-based investment fund Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP). The windfarm is 120km off the Yorkshire coast and will feature 174 Siemens Gamesa 7MW turbines.

In September last year, Ørsted agreed to sell 50% of its stake in Hornsea 1 offshore windfarm to GIP for $5.8bn.

UK managing director Ørsted Matthew Wright said: “Hornsea 1 is the first of a new generation of offshore power plants that now rival the capacity of traditional fossil fuel power stations.

“The ability to generate clean electricity offshore at this scale is a globally significant milestone, at a time when urgent action is needed to tackle climate change.”

“The ability to generate clean electricity offshore at this scale is a globally significant milestone, at a time when urgent action needs to be taken to tackle climate change.

“Ten years ago, the thought of a project of this size was just a dream, but thanks to continued innovation, a determined effort from both the industry and supply chain to drive down costs, and the natural geographical benefits that surround us, the UK has positioned itself as a world-leader in offshore wind.”

To date, 172 out of 174 monopile foundations are reported to have been installed at the site. Turbine installation is expected to complete later this year.

Energy generated by the turbines will pass through an undersea cable via one of three offshore substations and an offshore reactive compensation station, before reaching the shore at Horseshoe Point, Lincolnshire.

Electricity is then transmitted via underground cables to the onshore substation in North Killingholme, where it connects to the UK National Grid.

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