42 organisations agree with Global Battery Alliance sustainability principles

Yoana Cholteeva 24 January 2020 (Last Updated January 24th, 2020 16:51)

The Global Battery Alliance (GBA), a public-private coalition, has outlined ten guiding principles to encourage the creation of a sustainable battery value chain by 2030.

42 organisations agree with Global Battery Alliance sustainability principles
The principles are the first step to a responsible battery value chain. Source Piqsels

The Global Battery Alliance (GBA), a public-private coalition, has outlined ten guiding principles to encourage the creation of a sustainable battery value chain by 2030.

Currently 42 organisations, including businesses from the automotive, mining, chemicals and energy sectors, with a combined revenue of approximately one trillion dollars, have agreed on the proposed principles.

These include: maximising battery productivity, ensuring transparency of greenhouse gas emissions and their progressive reduction, and protecting public health.

The principles would contribute towards increased battery efficiency and sustainability, by reinforcing safe work practises. This will also help establish trust in the industry.

World Economic Forum managing director Dominic Waughray said “We all need batteries to power the clean revolution. However, we must ensure violations of human rights do not occur anywhere in the value chain, that local communities benefit and that battery production is sustainable.

“These guiding principles are an important first step to build a value chain that can deliver on this promise while supporting societies and economies at the same time,” he added.

The principles are the first step to a responsible, sustainable battery value chain as set out in the GBA’s “Vision for a Sustainable Battery Value Chain in 2030”.

This agreement among battery market leaders establishes the basis for a transparent accountability system. It will guide the development of a global digital battery information disclosure system referred to as the “Battery Passport”, which is designed to enable a transparent value chain and ensure battery manufacturers aren’t violating human rights laws during battery production.

Cadenza Innovation, the lithium-ion battery provider, Founder and Chief Executive Officer Christina Lampe-Onnerud said “An efficient, transparent, sustainable global value chain is vital to ensuring that the battery industry continues to meet unprecedented demand in an innovative and socially responsible manner.

“The guidelines put forth by the Global Battery Alliance provide a thoughtful and actionable approach for ensuring that,” she added.

In the next decade, batteries will be a major driver in reducing the carbon footprint of the transport and power sectors. Globally, it is estimated that consumer electronics lithium-ion battery market alone will reach 54 gigawatt hours by 2025.