Shell joins GWEC to expand offshore wind power business

Talal Husseini 24 October 2018 (Last Updated October 24th, 2018 11:30)

Oil and gas company Shell has joined the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), as the company looks to expand its renewable wind power business as part of its Shell New Energies Strategies.

Shell joins GWEC to expand offshore wind power business
Shell has joined the Global Wind Energy Council as a board-level member, in an attempt to develop its renewable wind power business. Credit: Lars Plougmann.

Oil and gas company Shell has joined the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), as the company looks to expand its renewable offshore wind power business as part of its Shell New Energies Strategies.

GWEC chief executive officer Ben Backwell said: “We are delighted to have Shell join GWEC’s board. Shell’s experience across energy markets in many geographies and deep knowledge of technology development and engineering will bring a valuable new perspective to our work in accelerating the growth of the wind industry across the world.”

Shell announced its decision to join the group at China Wind Power 2018, China’s largest energy show in Beijing, which attracts more than 20,000 people from the industry.

The company will join GWEC as a board-level member and will also be active in the council’s Offshore Taskforce, which aims to combine expertise from within the industry to expedite offshore wind developments across the world.

Shell vice-president for wind development Dorine Bosman said: “We are pleased to join GWEC and their Offshore Taskforce to help accelerate the development of offshore wind, an important part of Shell’s growing New Energies portfolio. We look forward to working with Ben and his team and the other GWEC members.”

Fostering offshore wind power worldwide

According to GWEC, the wind power industry is expected to grow from 538GW total installed capacity in 2017, to 841GW in 2022, representing an increase of 56.32%.

GWEC’s Offshore Taskforce has already attracted some big players in the industry, including Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE), Ørsted, and Iberdrola, as well as developers, investors, wind turbine manufacturers, and technical experts.

Its aims include advising government on offshore wind regulations; providing cost-benefit analysis on offshore wind deployment; fostering technological innovation to optimise wind farm equipment; and creating a forum for knowledge sharing across Europe and worldwide.

“Offshore wind has huge potential in many regions, as the world looks for competitive, zero carbon energy sources that can be deployed at scale and in relatively fast time frames,” said GWEC Global Offshore Wind Ambassador Henrik Stiesdal.

“However, the industry needs to find the most appropriate technologies for deploying offshore wind in different conditions – for example floating offshore wind in regions with deep water levels, and creating efficient supply chains across the globe.”